PSYCHVINE

Category: Enabling

In several previous blogs, we discussed domestic abuse and violence. In the first blog, we reviewed common abusive behaviors known as gaslighting. The second blog discussed more examples of gaslighting behavior. Finally, we wrote on the topic of why people return to toxic relationships. The following TED talk by Leslie Morgan Steiner describes a moving account of one woman’s story.      

This blog discusses five of the most common parenting pitfalls we have encountered in our many years of practice as clinical psychologists. But it’s just a start (we probably have 20 more that you’ll see in future blogs). Please realize that we do not intend to pillory parents who engage in these misguided strategies because just about every mom and dad on the planet makes these mistakes from time to time. Rather, we want to focus your attention on these…

Police, social workers, and medical personnel who work with domestic violence victims frequently feel frustrated when they see abused victims return to their toxic relationships over and over again. Families and friends of abused victims can’t understand how someone they care about could possibly repeatedly make the same horrible decision. So just exactly why do people return to toxic, abusive relationships? There are actually a number of reasons such as: Feeling helpless and hopeless: Abusers almost always go after their…

In our last blog, we discussed a psychological phenomenon known as gaslighting. In brief, gaslighting refers to a wide variety of behaviors aimed at a target person in order to sow the seeds of self-doubt, insecurity, dependency, and inadequacy. Continuing from the earlier blog, here is another example: A gaslighter tells the victim something very illogical, but insists he is correct. He then inserts two or three outright lies within an overall string of truths.  Gaslighters sometimes misrepresent findings of…

Let’s say you’ve completely backed up your home computer to its external hard drive, then had your computer  cleaned and wiped out for a total reinstall. Later that day, you return to your computer and attempt to restore the contents of your external hard drive. Suddenly, you can’t find any of your data on that hard drive. Decades’ worth of photos, music, e-mails, documents, and cherished memories seemingly vanished. You ask your computer savvy husband for help. He says, “I’m…

You may have a counselor, therapist, social worker, psychiatrist, or psychologist. If you’ve been in therapy for a while, you probably have a trusting, helpful, and caring relationship with your therapist. In fact, if you don’t, you should probably consider seeking another mental health professional for a consultation—possibly your therapist isn’t the right choice for you. You may think you know your therapist; after all, you’ve probably seen your therapist weekly or so for a number of months or more…

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