PSYCHVINE

Tag: psychotherapy

Fred begins this session by asking Dr. Smelt, “How’s it going, Doc? Did you have a good week?” “Just fine, Fred. But I’d like to know how your week went.” “Nothing much happened. Work has been a real bitch though.” “I remember you work for the city in I.T. What kinds of problems have you been having?” Dr. Smelt queries. “I’m overloaded with crap. Too many meetings, too many bosses. Morale sucks. What else do you want to know?” “I…

“Before we go any further,” Dr. Smelt says, “I want to tell you a bit about confidentiality.” “No need,” Fred interrupts, “I know that bull shit. You tell me you’re like a priest, but if the judge wants to know something, you’ll tell him. That’s the real world. All this stuff about confidentiality is a way for you to get me to spill my guts. But, I’m not telling you anything that could get me into more trouble with the…

In our last blog, you met Dr. Patricia Smelt and her client, Kimberly. Dr. Smelt is trying to figure out what Kimberly wants out of therapy. She has detected a whiff of resistance. Dr. Smelt’s last question was, “So, if we asked your boyfriend what he thinks you need from coming here, what do you think he’d say?” Let’s see what happens next. Kimberly hesitates and rubs her forehead, “I guess he might say I need to work on my…

Dr. Patricia Smelt is a clinical psychologist. Actually, she’s fictional, and represents a composite of Dr. Laura Smith and Dr. Charles Elliott (clever, eh?). We decided to make Dr. Smelt female for no particularly good reason although a majority of new psychologists nowadays are, in fact, female. Dr. Smelt has had a total of 25 years of clinical experience and has special expertise in cognitive behavioral therapy. She is well respected in the mental health community and has written a…

Dr. Smith and I both take a scientific approach to psychology. Therefore, most of the blogs you see on Psychvine come from controlled studies and evidence. We also don’t hesitate to express our opinions about important psychological issues, but we try to be careful in distinguishing between our opinions and facts. And, even our opinions, are usually at least informed by evidence and what makes good scientific sense. We believe that’s the way it should be. The practice of psychology…